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CALGARY BOAT AND SPORTSMAN SHOW

 

JOIN US AT THE CALGARY BOAT AND SPORTSMAN SHOW
BMO Centre, Stampede Park, Calgary, AB.

Here’s your chance to buy Tickets for the upcoming
PF Calgary’s 22nd Annual Dinner and Auction
which will be held on Wednesday, April 29, 2015.
Our Special Raffles tickets will be on sale too.

 

RAFFLE

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND – GREAT GUNS RAFFLE!!!
$20 PER TICKET
10 guns will be drawn for in ascending order of value on
April 29, 2015 at the 22nd Annual PF Calgary Fundraising Dinner and Auction
Winning tickets are eligible for one gun only. No exchanges.
Must be 18 years of age or older to purchase tickets
Draw Date: April 29, 2015
You don’t have to attend the draw to win.
CALL THE PF OFFICE 403-995-9960 TO PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS

TO BE DRAWN FOR IN ASCENDING ORDER OF VALUE

  • Stoeger Upland Youth 410 Gauge 22” Side x Side Shotgun
  • Uberti Silverboy 22LR 19” Rifle
  • Benelli Nova Youth 20 Gauge 24” APG HD Pump Action Shotgun
  • Stoeger M3500 12 Gauge 26” MAX4 Semi Auto Shotgun
  • Franchi Affinity Compact 20 Gauge 24” Semi Auto Shotgun
  • Benelli M2 12 Gauge 28” MAX4 Semi Auto Shotgun
  • Sako 85 Hunter 30-06 Wire Sight Rifle
  • Beretta A400 Xtreme Unico MAX4 12 Gauge 30” Semi Auto Shotgun
  • Benelli Ethos 12 Gauge 28” Semi Auto Shotgun
  • Beretta 690 Field III 12 Gauge 28” Over/Under Shotgun

THE SPORTSMAN’S RAFFLE!!!
$20 PER TICKET 

Two fabulous prizes will be drawn for on
April 29, 2015 at the 22nd Annual PF Calgary Fundraising Dinner and Auction
First Draw: wins a 2015 Polaris Sportsman® ACE
Sponsored by Polaris and Cycle Works Motorsports
Second Draw: wins a Pair of Beretta Shotguns
687 Silver Pigeon V 20 Gauge
687 Silver Pigeon V 12 Gauge
Winning tickets are eligible for one prize only. No exchanges.
Must be 18 years of age or older to purchase tickets
Draw Date: April 29, 2015
You don’t have to attend the draw to win.
CALL THE PF OFFICE 403-995-9960 TO PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS

 

 

TICKETS for the WINNERS CHOICE RAFFLE and our BUCKET RAFFLES
will be available the night of the dinner.

Milk River Ridge Reservoir Water Quality Stewardship Initiative

 

Milk River Ridge Reservoir Water Quality Stewardship Initiative

The Milk River Ridge Reservoir Water Quality Stewardship Initiative (MRRRWQSI) is a multi-year collaborative initiative of the County of Warner and Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development (ESRD). In 2014 several conservation organizations agreed to partner with ESRD and the County; their involvement will be focused on securing and enhancing wildlife habitat within individual stewardship project areas.

The MRRRWQSI initiative consists of 9 separate projects around the Waterton-St. Mary Headworks inlet canal and the shorelands of Milk River Ridge Reservoir. The lands in question are predominantly Provincial Crown land (which are sometimes referred to as “public land”). In the past these lands were often called “right-of-way” lands, but today they are referred to as the “provincial land corridor”.

The Stewardship Initiative has as its overall aim the improvement of water quality within ESRD’s headwork canal and Milk River Ridge Reservoir through the restoration of impacted shorelands and riparian areas. Water quality declines in previous years are attributed in part to a significant degradation of the provincial land corridor which surrounds the Reservoir and the headwork canal that enters into the reservoir inlet. By returning ecological function to compromised corridor lands they will be able to function as environmental buffers to intercept and slow runoff from the Milk River Ridge, and better anchor riparian areas and shore lands with desired vegetation communities.

County of Warner representatives approached ESRD staff in the spring of 2013 to discuss the need to more effectively manage the provincial land corridor along ESRD’s water management headwork canals and Ridge Reservoir. Numerous impacts, unauthorized activities and encroachments have occurred on the provincial land corridor over a period of several decades, in some cases preventing these shorelands from functioning as ecological buffers. Shoreland degradation and poor land use practices are contributing to a diminishment of water quality in Ridge Reservoir. Restoration actions and better stewardship actions (both on provincial Crown land and adjacent private land) will help in minimizing water quality declines that have resulted from poor land use practices.

Agreement was reached that a collaborative partnership should be formed between the County and the Department and that a stewardship initiative should be undertaken to: a) identify the provincial land corridor boundary for the benefit of adjacent landowners and the public, b) systematically address wide-ranging provincial land corridor impacts, and c) undertake habitat enhancements wherever opportunities exist to do so with the involvement of conservation partners.

  • The Alberta Conservation Association has agreed to coordinate the involvement of participating conservation partners:
  • Pheasants Forever – Calgary
  • Pheasants Forever – Lethbridge
  • Lethbridge Fish and Game club
  • Alberta Fish and Game Association

These partners would undertake on-the-ground activities to achieve wildlife habitat objectives within individual project areas on behalf of participating conservation partners, and receive and disburse partner funding. Conservation partners expressed an interest in funding and supporting the following activities on the provincial land corridor to benefit wildlife:

  • establish permanent cover on exposed soil using a native seed mixture
  • manage weeds in newly seeded areas
  • develop an artificial wetland in project “B”
  • develop MRRRWQSI project specific signage

2014 has been a productive year, ESRD has completed approximately 3 miles of fencing along the south shore of Milk River Ridge Reservoir and the canal system to the west of the reservoir. This has secured over 150 acres for wildlife habitat. All partners contributed to the purchase of grass seed to put approximately 90 acres of previously cultivated lands within the fenced areas back into permanent cover. ESRD is already taking action on activities for the 2015 season, which include further boundary surveys and fencing projects along the south and north shores of the reservoir. There will be ample opportunity for conservation groups to continue with this partnership in helping to re-establish vegetative buffers and create wildlife habitat in the upcoming years.

2014 Pheasants Forever Calgary in Review

 

2014 PHEASANTS FOREVER CALGARY IN REVIEW

Who we are…

  • Pheasant Forever, the Habitat Organization, is dedicated to the conservation of pheasants and other upland wildlife and their habitat. Our key goals are to restore and enhance the upland wildlife landscape, to promote sound land management programs in Southern Alberta, and to maintain and increase public awareness and education. PF Calgary celebrated its 22nd year in Alberta in 2014.
  • Pheasants Forever Calgary’s Annual Dinner and Auction consistently places in the top three in North America for membership and dollars raised.

What we did…

    • Pheasants Forever Calgary contributed to the securement of an additional 680 acres of habitat and the management of six Conservation Sites (4,221 acres) in collaboration with Alberta Conservation Association (Project Lead) and other partners (Alberta Fish and Game Association, Ducks Unlimited, PF-Chinook Chapter, Wild Elk Federation). These sites provide recreational opportunities (foot access only) to the public and were advertised in ACA’s “Discover Guide”. The Habitat Legacy Partnership (HLP) was initiated in 2009 to improve upland habitat and hunting opportunities in Southern Alberta. The partnership includes Alberta Conservation Association, Pheasants Forever Calgary, as well as The Chinook PF Chapter in Medicine Hat and the Lethbridge PF Chapter. Alberta Conservation Association implements the programming in collaboration with landowners and a host of agencies at the local and regional levels. The area of focus stretches from Lethbridge to the Montana border and east to Medicine Hat. The six Conservation sites include:
    • 1. East Hays Conservation Site (144 acres – ACA, AFGA, PF-Calgary, PF-Chinook)
      • Continued maintenance of 11,000 shrubs planted in 2010 including the replacement of approximately 1,000 shrubs.
      • Continued maintenance of the 13 acres of wetlands constructed in 2009 and 2010.
      • Completed planting of 10 acres of nesting, brood and escape cover in the spring of 2014.
    • 2. Legacy Conservation Site (100 acres + 40 acres habitat lease – ACA)
      • Continued the maintenance of the 12 acre wetland complex constructed in 2011.
      • Continued invasive species control on the 35 acre reseeding project for brood and nesting cover completed in 2011.
    • 3. Silver Sage Conservation Site (2,051 acres – ACA, AFGA, PF-Calgary, PF-Chinook)
      • Contributed to expansion of the site in 2014 by 468 acres from previous 1,583 acres
      • Continued maintenance and monitoring of the 960 acres being restored to native grass communities. Initiated plans for restoration of additional 240 acres.
      • Planted an additional mix of native forbs and shrubs on the site.
      • Removed, maintained, and installed 1.6km, 3.2km, and 1.6km of fence on west portion of site (SE/SW/NE-6-4-5-W4M)
      • Preliminary wildlife and range monitoring of the restoration project indicates a positive response with the presence of all seeded grasses and forbs and the detection of new species on the site.
      • MULTISAR initiating statistical analysis of bird community response to the native prairie restoration efforts (Winter, Spring 2015)
    • 4. Ross Creek Conservation Site (937 acres – ACA, AFGA, PF-Calgary, PF-Chinook)
      • Completed minor fencing to protect cottonwood establishment near the creek
      • Completed the installation of new signage and vehicle access controls.
      • Initiated invasive species control in yard site (would love to say completed but the burdock was nasty)
      • Used in the 2014 Provincial Pheasant Release Program
      • Finalizing plans to fence off wetland on NE-8 (near 2 acre subdivision) and installation of off-site watering system to protect wetland integrity
    • 5. Bull Trail Conservation Site (529 acres – ACA, AFGA, DUC, PF-Calgary, PF-Chinook, Wild Elk Federation)
      • Purchased in 2013 with funding from ACA, Alberta Fish and Game Association, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Government of Canada Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk, PF Calgary, PF Chinook (Medicine Hat), and Wild Elk Federation.
      • DUC completed additional flow restoration to tributary to Ross Creek (breached ditch to return flow)
      • MULTISAR completed range, riparian, and wildlife inventory (DRAFT Habitat Conservation Strategy completed).
      • Confirmed Northern Leopard Frog breeding area.
    • 6. Grantham Lake Expansion (420 acres – ACA, BRID, ESRD, PF-Calgary, PF-Chinook)
      • Contributed the first 5 year payment of a 20 year lease held by ACA from the Bow River Irrigation District.
      • This lease doubles the size of the existing Grantham Lake Conservation Site (208 acres to 420 acres).
      • Range inventory completed (awaiting report)
      • East boundary survey completed for future fencing.

We also participated in…

    • A contribution was made towards the purchase of 3,674 shrubs that were planted on 4 different habitat sites in Southern Alberta. Mulch and drip irrigation was installed on over 1,000 of the shrubs to reduce competition and increase survival.
    • A contribution was made to the Milk River Ridge Connectivity Project. The main goal is to increase hunting access to land along canals and the Milk River Ridge Reservoir. In 2014 our funds helped to recover over 90 acres of government easement land along canals and reservoirs that were fenced off to hunters while under assumed control by producers for cattle and cultivation. This land was re-fenced and seeded back to permanent cover beneficial for upland birds.
    • A contribution towards the purchase of GPS collars for hunting dogs that are used to conduct upland bird productivity and density surveys. These surveys are important for evaluating how well game birds are responding to habitat improvement over time as well as for providing hunters with an annual snap shot of bird trends. The survey is led by ACA with the help of many volunteers, and their dogs!
    • A local pheasant population can wink-out over time from harsh winter storms. With the landscape increasingly fragmented by intensive farming there are many pockets of good habitat that haven’t been reestablished by pheasants over the past 30 years. We contributed funds toward the purchase of radio transmitters that are being used to evaluate methods for reestablishing hen pheasants and assessing their survival and reproductive success over time. In September 2014 ACA released 165 hens including 50 with radio collars.
    • Following a site review of the Ducks Unlimited Circle E Habitat Project, ACA confirmed that it was able and willing to accept a donation from PF Calgary to be directed towards the Circle E Habitat Project near Vauxhaul for the repair, maintenance and replacement of water control structures that were observed on the site tour. As a result of the foregoing, a donation was made to ACA in support of this worthwhile wetlands and upland bird habitat project.

We work together with…

  • PF Calgary actively supports youth education programs that encourage and instill conservation ethics, responsible sportsmanship and an appreciation for wildlife. Such programs include the Pheasants Forever Annual Youth/Novice Shoot partnered with the Alberta Hunter Education Instructors’ Association. This event, held on the third Saturday in September at the Calgary Firearms Center, recruits and welcomes youth and adult novices to the shooting sports. This year’s event will take place on Saturday, September 19, 2015.
  • PF Calgary participated in the fourth Pheasant Festival in Taber, Alberta this past fall. 3500 birds were released on 30 sites within 100 kilometres of Taber over six days. Over 600 hunters and 70 youth hunters enjoyed a free half day of hunting determined by a computer reservation system during the second week of the season. The festival is planned again for the fall of 2015.